G’Day,

After some significant pain, I setup linux dual boot for the mac, but what I really want is to sometimes boot into linux, and sometimes just access the linux from my macos.  So you think no worries, Parallels supports Boot Camp, just use that. Wrong.  For Parallels to use a file system it needs to be mountable by the mac. CentOS uses ext3, and by default the mac doesn’t support ext2/ext3.  So

  • Step 1. Install CentOS using Boot Camp.  (see here…) TODO
  • Step 2. Reboot into MacOS, and install Mac Fuse
  • Step 3. Install fuse-ext2 (see Mount Ext2/Ext3 file system from a mac)
  • Step 4. Create a new Parallels install using the custom settings and boot camp partition. Here are the step-by-step screen shots.

Create New Virtual Machine

Choose Boot Camp Partition, click Continue

Select Version: More Linux -> CentOS Linux

Click Continue

Virutal Machine Type: Click Custom

CPU and Memory Options: I like 1G of main memory, click continue

Hard Disk Options: choose Boot Camp Partition, click Continue

I only have one disk, but pick the right one, click Continue

I like Shared Networking (Recommended), click Continue

Optimize for Virtual machine (Recommended) seems like a good choice, after all if you want to optimize for the mac, then don’t run the virtual machine.  You can always change this later.

Pick a name and a location for the Virtual machine, click Create.

When you start up the vm .. done

And soon enough you see the CentOS linux running inside my mac.

One Comment

  1. rezwits says:

    Awesome, been waiting for that. When last I tried I was using ExtFS from Paragon, and it was having problems with mounting and un-mounting at startup using Parallels 4, so I switched and went to Fusion, but I guess I’ll go back to Parallels 6 now !! oh so happy. Have to see if Fusion has got this feature update… been about 1.5 years since I tried 😛 thanks for the heads up…

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